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Environmental Cleanup Site Information (ECSI) Database Site Summary Report - Details for Site ID 2086, Johnson Lake - See Owens Brockway site 1311

This report shows data entered as of January 26, 2022 at 2:25:39 AM

This report contains site details, organized into the following sections: 1) Site Photos (appears only if the site has photos); 2) General Site Information; 3) Site Characteristics; 4) Substance Contamination Information; 5) Investigative, Remedial and Administrative Actions; and 6) Site Environmental Controls (i.e., institutional or engineering controls; appears only if DEQ has applied one or more such controls to the site).  A key to certain acronyms and terms used in the report appears at the bottom of the page.

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Environmental Cleanup Site Information (ECSI) Database Site Summary Report - Details for Site ID 2086, Johnson Lake - See Owens Brockway site 1311

Site Photos
Click to View Photo Picture Date Caption Size
View Photo 05/09/2005 Johnson Lake looking west 708 Kb

General Site Information

Site ID: 2086 Site Name: Johnson Lake - See Owens Brockway site 1311 CERCLIS No:
Address: West of I-205, East of NE 92nd St. Portland 97220
  County: Multnomah Region: Northwest
Other location information:
Investigation Status: No further action required
Brownfield Site: No NPL Site: No Orphan Site: No Study Area: No
Property: Twnshp/Range/Sect: 1N , 2E , 16 Tax Lots:
  Latitude: 45.565 deg. Longitude: -122.5619 deg.  Site Size: 18 acres
Other Site Names:
  SEE ALSO ECSI #1311, OWENS BROCKWAY

Site Characteristics

General Site Description: [4/19/2021 VCP/Landes]: Johnson Lake is an 18-acre lake located just west of I-205, north of NE Columbia Blvd., and south of the Columbia Slough, in Portland. The lake is directly connected to Whitaker Slough, an arm of the Columbia Slough. The Owens Brockway glass plant is located at 5850 NE 92nd Drive in Portland, Oregon and is adjacent to Johnson Lake.

The site is currently in long-term monitoring, in accordance with the 2012 Operations and Maintenance Plan. The next cap inspection and fish tissue study is planned for Summer 2022.

Under a voluntary agreement with DEQ, Owens-Brockway completed an environmental cleanup of contaminated lake sediment and shoreline soil in 2014. DEQ issued a No Further Action Recommendation in 2012 and a Certiciate of Completion in 2014 confirming that the remedial action had been completed in accordance with the 2007 Record of Decision (ROD) and July 2009 ROD Amendment. In 2009, Owens Brockway entered into a Consent Judgment with the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ), dated September 1, 2009, to complete environmental work at the Site.

Work Performed: Remediation began in September 2011 and was completed in March 2012. Remedial work included placing placing a sediment isolation cap of 6 inches of clean sand over the existing sediment bed to reduce the concentrations of PCBs and other COCs available in the biologically active surface sediments. A small portion of the sediment near the Slough was left uncapped to serve as a source of benthic species, including native mussels, to re-establish the benthic community at the lake.

Click here and see ECSI 1311 for links to additional documents related to Johnson Lake.
Site History:
Contamination Information: Sediment sampling conducted by the City of Portland in 1995 and follow-up investigations by Owens-Brockway Glass Container Inc. in 2004 detected elevated concentrations of several contaminants, including polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), in the lake on an adjacent shoreline.

In 1995, Parametrix, Inc. conducted a Screening-Level Risk Assessment (SLRA) for the City of Portland's Bureau of Environmental Services (BES). Parametrix evaluated 300 sediment samples from Columbia Slough. Ten "Priority A" and 24 "Priority B" sediment samples were identified in the Slough system. Two Priority A sediment sample sites were identified in Johnson Lake. The key risk at these sediment sites is from PCBs. One sediment sample was taken at the southeast side of the lake where three former lagoons discharged via a ditch to the lake. These lagoons were located on the Owens-Brockway Glass Container site. This sample has the highest level of PCBs (380 ppb) of the samples taken in Johnson Lake. Sediment samples also document metals contamination. These may be normal background (aside from lead, which seems elevated over averages presented in the literature, with a high of 124 ppm). Some organic compounds were also found in the sediment samples. Toluene and 4-methylphenol, in particular, may be at levels that pose a risk to benthic organisms. In 1995, Parametrix, Inc. conducted a Screening-Level Risk Assessment (SLRA) for the City of Portland's Bureau of Environmental Services (BES). Parametrix evaluated 300 sediment samples from Columbia Slough. Ten "Priority A" and 24 "Priority B" sediment samples were identified in the Slough system. Two Priority A sediment sample sites were identified in Johnson Lake. The key risk at these sediment sites is from PCBs. One sediment sample was taken at the southeast side of the lake where three former lagoons discharged via a ditch to the lake. These lagoons were located on the Owens-Brockway Glass Container site. This sample has the highest level of PCBs (380 ppb) of the samples taken in Johnson Lake. Sediment samples also document metals contamination. These may be normal background (aside from lead, which seems elevated over averages presented in the literature, with a high of 124 ppm). Some organic compounds were also found in the sediment samples. Toluene and 4-methylphenol, in particular, may be at levels that pose a risk to benthic organisms.
Manner and Time of Release:
Hazardous Substances/Waste Types: PCBs, lead, toluene, 4-methylphenol

Sampling indicated the presence of PCBs, metals, petroleum, and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons in lake sediments. PCBs have also been detected in the tissue of fish collected from the lake.
Pathways: The Johnson Lake site consists of about 15 acres of lake and surrounding property. The lake shore is about 9 acres of the 15-acre parcel, and is undeveloped. The lake is generally a rectangular shape and is surrounded by a dense vegetation of blackberries, deciduous trees and tall grass on all four sides. The Whitaker Slough runs along the north side of Johnson Lake and joins it on its west end, where the lake flows into Whitaker Slough. Johnson Lake is considered part of the Whitaker Slough portion of the Columbia Slough drainage system. The Upper Slough is north of the Whitaker Slough and Johnson Lake.
Environmental/Health Threats:
Status of Investigative or Remedial Action: [4/19/2021 VCP/Landes]: The site is currently in long-term monitoring, in accordance with the 2012 Operations and Maintenance Plan. The next cap inspection and fish tissue study is planned for the summer in 2022.

The last annual inspection and fish tissue study was completed in 2017. In 2017, Owens-Brockway conducted a cap inspection and fish tissue study to evaluate changes in PCB concentrations in fish. The cap inspection indicated the cap remains in place and is performing well. Native vegetation has regrown around the edge of the lake. The concentrations of PCBs in fish tissue in Johnson Lake were lower in 2017 than they were in 2004. However, the concentrations remain above human consumption risk based criteria of 0.39 micrograms per kilogram (µg/Kg). The average PCB concentrations decreased from 260 µg/Kg in 2004 to 106 µg/Kg in 2017.

DEQ issued a No Further Action Recommendation in 2012 and a Certiciate of Completion in 2014 confirming that the remedial action had been completed in accordance with the 2007 Record of Decision (ROD) and July 2009 ROD Amendment. Upland cleanup was completed Fall 2009.

Investigation history: A federal screening was performed on Johnson Lake because it is part of the Columbia Slough Study Area. Further site investigation was recommended on two sites within the vicinity of Johnson Lake: Investigation associated with evaluating Owens-Brockway Glass Container and Myers Container Company.

A site investigation and risk assessment was conducted in 2004 and included sediment sampling, bioassays, and fish tissue sampling. DEQ issued a Record of Decision for Remedial Action in July 2007. Additional PCB sampling was conducted July 2008, and a ROD amendment was issued July 2009.
Data Sources: Click here for links to additional documents related to Johnson Lake.

CH2M Hill, Water Body Assessment, Columbia Slough TMDL Development, prepared for City of Portland, Bureau of Environmental Services, 1995; Pacific Northern Geoscience, Phase I Environmental Site Assessment, Johnson Lake Property, Prepared for the City of Portland, Bureau of Environmental Services, Project No.95-32347-01, July 15, 1995; Parametrix, Inc., Screening-Level Risk Assessment, Columbia Slough Sediment Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study, prepared for the City of Portland, Bureau of Environmental Services, February 1995.

Substance Contamination Information

Substance Media Contaminated Concentration Level Date Recorded
CRESOL,4- Sediment 1600 ppb (alias is 4-methylphenol) 2/1/1995
LEAD Sediment 124 ppm 2/1/1995
PCBs Sediment  
PCBs Sediment 380 ppb 2/1/1995
TOLUENE Sediment 4600 ppb 2/1/1995

Investigative, Remedial and Administrative Actions

Action Start Date Compl. Date Resp. Staff Lead Pgm
Periodic Review  (Primary Action) 02/04/2020   Franziska Landes VCP
View Full Report Showing Action History

Key to Certain Acronyms and Terms in this Report:

You may be able to obtain more information about this site by contacting Franziska Landes at the Northwest regional office or via email at franziska.landes@deq.oregon.gov. If this does not work, you may contact Ximena Cruz Cuevas (503) 229-6811, or via email at ximena.cruzcuevas@deq.state.or.us or contact the Northwest regional office.